ALERTS:
Search:
Skip Navigation LinksCherry Creek School District > District News > "A Team Effort": EMTs, Physicians and CCSD athletic trainers come together for important training
Print this page

"A Team Effort": EMTs, Physicians and CCSD athletic trainers come together for important training

​​CCSD trainers work with local EMTs and physicians during an emergency exercise on Aug. 17.The word "team" came up again and again as a group of CCSD athletic trainers stood on the Legacy Stadium field alongside emergency responders from South Metro Fire and Rescue on Aug. 17.

The 10 trainers from high schools across the Cherry Creek School District stood in a semicircle on the astroturf, listening intently to instructions from South Metro Training Captain Chris Wells. A Cherokee Trail High School student lay completely still on the ground, playing the convincing part of an injured athlete in one of the many training exercises of the day.

"This is a young adult who's been injured on the field during a game," Wells explained, setting up the scenario. "What does he need right now to save his life?"

The trainers offered feedback, but they were also quick to listen to the suggestions from Wells and his team of EMTs. The group of employees representing athletic departments from across the district's 108 square miles were there to learn, and they wanted to soak up all of the information they possibly could. As Wells detailed proper procedures and explained the differences between treating teenagers and adults, the trainers seemed to soak up every word.

For the second year in a row, CCSD athletic staff and local EMTs came together as a team with a simple goal in mind: ensuring the safety of every student athlete in the district. The training event took place less than a week before the formal launch of fall sports in Cherry Creek Schools, and the emergency responders' sessions came along with on-site training from physicians from the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children.​

 

"Everybody needs to be on the same page when it comes to providing emergency care for all of our students," said Ashley Krause, head athletic trainer for the district and for Cherokee Trail High School. "Our trainers and coaches are highly trained professionals, but we want to emphasize the importance of practicing emergency procedures for everyone. There are always things we can tweak and improve."

The CCSD trainers went over on-field emergency response techniques with the EMTs designed to address spinal injuries and cardiac arrest before training with high-tech emergency mannequins designed to provide immediate feedback for dealing with issues ranging from cardiac arrest to seizure. Trainers practiced moving an immobile victim onto a spinal board and a gurney; they practiced responding to anaphylaxis and heat stroke.

CCSD Athletics and Activities Director Larry Bull participated alongside the trainers, and he was careful to stress the importance of taking the lessons in emergency medicine back to every individual coach in every individual school.

"We need to make sure that we're having these conversations with our coaches and staff," Bull said. "If there's an injury on the field, we need to work as a team, from the field all the way to the emergency room."

That kind of collaborative thinking has made the Cherry Creek School District a leader in the field of emergency response medicine for athletes, according to Dr. Brooke Pengel, medical director of the Sports Medicine Program at the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children.CCSD trainers work with local EMTs and physicians during an emergency exercise on Aug. 17.

"The Cherry Creek School District is leading the way in terms of training and organized protocols," Pengel said. "They practice every year, and really do it the right way."

Dr. Sue Kaivelik, medical director of the hospital's Center for Concussions and staff pediatric emergency physician, added that running through specific, detailed scenarios was valuable for all medical professionals, including athletic trainers with years of experience. For issues ranging from concussions to lightning strikes, there's always room to gain more experience.

"This is so important. We do these kinds of trainings in the emergency department at the hospital," Kaivelik said. "Running through these scenarios starts to make the response automatic," she said, adding that a rapid approach can make a critical difference in saving the life of a child.

Wells stressed similar points again and again. Whether the victim is an athlete, a spectator or a coach, having as many people with proper training nearby can make all the difference.

"It's not lip service when we say it's a team effort. Larry Bull and the district have left no stone unturned when it comes to this training," Wells said. "The more people who are in the know when it comes to emergency response, the more people can help … It will lead to the best outcome."

Posted 8/21/2018 10:35 AM
 

​"The Cherry Creek School District is leading the way in terms of training and organized protocols ... They practice every year, and really do it the right way."

--  Dr. Brooke Pengel, medical director of the Sports Medicine Program at the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children

 

Copyright © Cherry Creek School District #5, 4700 S. Yosemite Street, Greenwood Village, CO 80111 | 303-773-1184
Cherry Creek School District No. 5 does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability in admission to its programs, services or activities, in access to them, in treatment of individuals, or in any aspect of their operations. The lack of English language skills shall not be a barrier to admission or participation in the district’s activities and programs. The Cherry Creek School District No. 5 also does not discriminate in its hiring or employment practices. This notice is provided as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Questions, complaints, or requests for additional information regarding these laws may be forwarded to the designated compliance officer: District Compliance Officer or directly to the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Region VIII, Federal Office Building 1244 North Speer Blvd., Suite #310, Denver, CO 80204.

You are now leaving the Cherry Creek School District (CCSD) portal. Please note that CCSD does not control nor can it guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, completeness, or appropriateness of any content contained on web sites and/or pages outside of the official CCSD portal. The information or opinions contained on these web sites and/or pages do not necessarily represent the views of the CCSD.

With access to the internet comes the availability of material that may not be of educational value or appropriate for students. While at school, CCSD has taken precautions to restrict access to inappropriate or harmful web sites. However, on the internet it is impossible to control all materials and limit all access to information that has no educational value. CCSD firmly believes that the valuable information and the interaction available on the internet far outweigh the possibility that users may procure material that is not consistent with the educational goals of CCSD.